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Mental Health Facts

  • Mental health disorders account for several of the top causes of disability in established market economies, such as the U.S., worldwide, and include: major depression (also called clinical depression), manic depression (also called bipolar disorder), schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  • An estimated 26% of Americans ages 18 and older -- about 1 in 4 adults -- suffers from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year.

  • Many people suffer from more than one mental disorder at a given time. In particular, depressive illnesses tend to co-occur with substance abuse and anxiety disorders.

  • Approximately 9.5% of American adults ages 18 and over, will suffer from a depressive illness (major depression, bipolar disorder, or dysthymia) each year.

    • Women are nearly twice as likely to suffer from major depression than men. However, men and women are equally likely to develop bipolar disorder.

    • While major depression can develop at any age, the average age at onset is the mid-20s.

    • With bipolar disorder, which affects approximately 2.6% of Americans age 18 and older in a given year -- the average age at onset for a first manic episode is during the early 20s.

  • Most people who commit suicide have a diagnosable mental disorder -- most commonly a depressive disorder or a substance abuse disorder.

    • Four times as many men than women commit suicide. However, women attempt suicide more often than men.

    • The highest suicide rates in the U.S. are found in Caucasian men over age 85. However, suicide is also one of the leading causes of death in adolescents and adults ages 15 to 24.

  • Approximately 1% of Americans are affected by schizophrenia.

    • In most cases, schizophrenia first appears in men during their late teens or early 20s. In women, schizophrenia often first appears during their 20s or early 30s.

  • Approximately about 18% of people ages 18- 54 in a given year, have an anxiety disorder in a given year. Anxiety disorders include: panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and phobias (social phobia, agoraphobia, and specific phobia).

    • Panic disorder typically develops in late adolescence or early adulthood.

    • The first symptoms of OCD often begin during childhood or adolescence.

    • GAD can begin at any time, though the risk is highest between childhood and middle age.

    • Individuals with OCD frequently can have problems with substance abuse or depressive or eating disorders.

    • Social phobia typically begins in childhood or adolescence.


These are the latest statistics available from the National Institute of Mental Health Disorders, part of the National Institutes of Health as apart of a study by John Hopkins Medical in 2020

 

Truth about kids mental health

Facts and the numbers

Mental disorders among children are described as serious changes in the way children typically learn, behave, or handle their emotions, causing distress and problems getting through the day.1 Among the more common mental disorders that can be diagnosed in childhood are attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety, and behavior disorders.

There are different ways to estimate which children have difficulties with mental health. CDC uses surveys, like the National Survey of Children’s Health, to understand which children have diagnosed mental disorders and whether they received treatment. In this type of survey, parents report on the diagnoses their child has received from a healthcare provider. Learn more facts about children’s mental disorders below.

  • ADHD, behavior problems, anxiety, and depression are the most commonly diagnosed mental disorders in children

    • 9.4% of children aged 2-17 years (approximately 6.1 million) have received an ADHD diagnosis.

    • 7.4% of children aged 3-17 years (approximately 4.5 million) have a diagnosed behavior problem

    • 7.1% of children aged 3-17 years (approximately 4.4 million) have diagnosed anxiety

    • 3.2% of children aged 3-17 years (approximately 1.9 million) have diagnosed depression.

  • Some of these conditions commonly occur together. For example:

    • Having another disorder is most common in children with depression: about 3 in 4 children aged 3-17 years with depression also have anxiety (73.8%) and almost 1 in 2 have behavior problems (47.2%)

    • For children aged 3-17 years with anxiety, more than 1 in 3 also have behavior problems (37.9%) and about 1 in 3 also have depression (32.3%)

    • For children aged 3-17 years with behavior problems, more than 1 in 3 also have anxiety (36.6%) and about 1 in 5 also have depression (20.3%)

  • Depression and anxiety have increased over time

    • “Ever having been diagnosed with either anxiety or depression” among children aged 6–17 years increased from 5.4% in 2003 to 8% in 2007 and to 8.4% in 2011–2012.

    • “Ever having been diagnosed with anxiety” increased from 5.5% in 2007 to 6.4% in 2011–2012.

    • “Ever having been diagnosed with depression” did not change between 2007 (4.7%) and 2011-2012 (4.9%).

  • Treatment rates vary among different mental disorders

    • Nearly 8 in 10 children (78.1%) aged 3-17 years with depression received treatment.

    • 6 in 10 children (59.3%) aged 3-17 years with anxiety received treatment.

    • More than 5 in 10 children (53.5%) aged 3-17 years with behavior disorders received treatment.

  • Mental, behavioral, and developmental disorders begin in early childhood

    • 1 in 6 U.S. children aged 2–8 years (17.4%) had a diagnosed mental, behavioral, or developmental disorder.

  • Rates of mental disorders change with age

    • Diagnoses of depression and anxiety are more common with increased age.

    • Behavior problems are more common among children aged 6–11 years than children younger or older.

  • Many family, community, and healthcare factors are related to children’s mental health

    • Among children aged 2-8 years, boys were more likely than girls to have a mental, behavioral, or developmental disorder.

    • Among children living below 100% of the federal poverty level, more than 1 in 5 (22%) had a mental, behavioral, or developmental disorder.

    • Age and poverty level affected the likelihood of children receiving treatment for anxiety, depression, or behavior problems.

Note: The rates reported on this page are estimates based on parent report, using nationally representative surveys. This method has several limitations. It is not known to what extent children receive these diagnoses accurately. Estimates based on parent-reported diagnoses may match those based on medical records, but children may also have mental disorders that have not been diagnosed.

These stats are from the CDC(Center for Disease Control and prevention)

 

The Progress Report w/Trevaris LeCount

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